Whoops, time for a catch-up! Every two months, things get a little busy here as I finish putting the magazine together and get it sent to the printer. We were particularly busy this time because of the clinic last month, and the fact that Ben and I finally got married three weeks ago (or: a week before the printer deadline. We are very inconvenient people).

There were no mules present (as we don’t own our own transport and got married 100 miles from home, the cost of hiring a lorry was quite prohibitive – particularly as we couldn’t rely on British weather to make arriving on muleback an enjoyable experience!), but here are a few wedding details for anyone who’s interested in that kind of stuff.

No mules, but here are our Pony cake toppers – I am Fluttershy, obviously, and Ben chose Meadow Song to represent him.
Oki – there WAS a mule! This was an awesome surprise gift from my hairdresser who pointed out that there were three of us in this marriage … I can’t argue with that, really. It was made by gallerythea.co.uk

I can’t wear rings because I have Reynauds, so we had these bracelets made instead. They read “A bright line across the water to you”, which is a phrase from one of the poems Ben wrote for me when he proposed.
Xato trying on my flower crown for size. There is a cascade of ivy hanging down the other side of his neck. and I’m pretty impressed that he didn’t try to eat it. Xato believes that everything belongs in Xato’s mouth.
We brought our balloons back to the field with us, too. Good ponies.

For the music lovers: I entered the room to Undying Love by Two Steps From Hell, and we left to “King and Lionheart” by Of Monsters And Men.

Anyway – back to mules!

Riding

Ben and I didn’t take a honeymoon, and instead had a couple of days off which we spent with the herd. We rode out together with Iris as the supposed good influence, but it ended up being the other way round! Xato went where he was pointed and didn’t break stride, no matter how many sudden spooks Iris threw in. I was really impressed by his complete non-reaction. The only point where he got worried was when we met a horsebox on the narrow lane, and had to squeeze between it and the bank in order to pass – while the horse inside kicked up a massive fuss! Xato hesitated, but I remembered not to grab my reins and after a moment he walked on through. Good mule.

The next time we went out, Ben decided to lead Iris because she is much more confident when he is on the ground. This meant that we could go onto the common for the first time! I wondered what Xato would be like when faced with this large expanse of land, but his energy levels literally didn’t change. He was just like “huh, this is cool” and on he plodded. We only did a very short route but I’m excited to ride further afield next time. We have some amazing countryside round here and I’ve waited a long time to explore it on board my own equine.

I think he enjoys going out, too!
Well, he’s not a horse! 😛
Check out the sunlight glowing through his left ear!
Waiting for Iris to stop worrying over the man mowing the green.
The entrance to the common is a bit of a jungle at this time of year.

Feet

Ah – yes, feet are where things aren’t so great at the moment. I will write about this in more detail later, in a specific post. I have already written about the initial incident on Facebook, here –  since then, Marty has remembered himself and become a star pupil; Xato, not so much! We have a little bit of work to do.

Goddamn fox chewed the leather popper off the end of my rope! Guess I can’t beat my mules with it anymore…
After Emma had gone and I’d turned everyone back out, I sat on the floor for a while to rest my back before continuing with chores. Xato came over and dropped a piece of straw on my foot, which was a nice gesture until he had a big, splashy wee right next to me.

The Track

I had to close off the section of track underneath the trees, as we had some very heavy rain and it turned into deep mud. We’re on sand here and mud doesn’t stay long, but it meant the ground became very soft and deep and I wasn’t comfortable with the herd trying to travel down it at speed. We don’t want anymore vets bills thank you please!

The end of the track as it is now.
We grazed this section of the inner field first, and as you can see it’s already growing back!
The other end of the track, at the bottom of the hill, as viewed from the cattle track.
I like to open up access to the cattle track while I poo pick, as it means the mules leave me alone for a bit and aren’t constantly pestering for attention. 😛 They’re very good about coming back in again at dinnertime.
Marty posing with the lake.
The lake is home to our family of geese. Ben and I have known these three babies since they were tiny little egberts, so we consider ourselves an honourary aunt and uncle.
They make a handsome herd, don’t they?
Please follow and like us:

Mulographer Sari

Sari was raised by cats which accounts for her solitary nature, occasional mania, and attraction to shiny objects. After riding and being around horses for 22 years, she discovered that she was, in fact, a mule girl and fell hopelessly in love with these extraordinary creatures. She lives in England and is married to Ben, who is potentially the best Ben who ever Benned.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial